Electrical Apprenticeships

Why an apprenticeship in Electrical and Electronic Servicing?

Doing an apprenticeship is the best way to become an electrician or electronic servicing engineer. It will give you a direct route into the industry, equip you with the hands-on training and experience you need and enable you to specialise in an area that suits you.

Who would it suit?

For this career, you will need to have a keen interest in technology plus good analytical and practical skills. You will be good at problem solving because a lot of what you do involves working out what’s causing an electrical or electronic item to stop working and the practical skills to do something about it. If your job involves going into people’s homes, you will need to be friendly and approachable. Good colour vision is important because a lot of the work involves identifying cables and components by colour.

What are the job opportunities?

As an apprentice you will be in an assistant role but once qualified you will be a professional electrical or electronic servicing engineer. You might choose to work on call, independently, for a company or you could work in a high street electrical shop.

What can I earn?

The minimum wage is around £150 per week but at the London Apprenticeship Company we recommend that apprentices are paid considerably more. Once fully qualified, you can earn approximately £13,000 – £18,000.

What will I learn?

You will get to choose from one of three areas of specialisation: signal reception (aerial systems); consumer/commercial electronics (TVs, audio systems and DVD players); or domestic electrical appliances (washing machines, microwaves and refrigerators). Whichever you choose, you’ll cover installation, servicing and maintenance procedures. On the advanced apprenticeship, you can complete optional courses in water supply, building regulations and a certificate in engineering.

How long does it take?

Training takes 12-18 months from start to completion.

What’s the training?

Apprenticeship training is structured so that you spend most of your time learning at work and some of your time at a training centre or completing training online.

All the qualifications you gain are recognised by employers and industry professionals.

These are the two most common levels of apprenticeship training for Electrical and Electronic Servicing:

The Level 2 Apprenticeship

NVQ in Electrical and Electronic Servicing Level 2
One of three pathways:

  1. Consumer/ Commercial Electronics
  2. Domestic Appliance Servicing
  3. Signal Reception
  • Technical Certificate Electrical Electronics Servicing Level 2:
    Consumer / Commercial Electronics or Domestic Electrical Appliances
  • Key Skills Communication Level 2 / Application of Number Level 2 / Information Technology Level 1
  • Employment Rights and Responsibilities

 

Additional Employer Requirements (optional – not mandatory components for framework completion):

  • Water Supply (Water Fittings)
  • Regulations 1999 Certificate
  • Building Regulations Part P Certificate
  • CSCS Safety Card

The Level 3 Advanced Apprenticeship

  • NVQ in Electrical and Electronic Servicing Level 3 Consumer/Commercial Electronics
  • Technical Certificate Electrical Electronics Servicing Level 3
  • Key Skills Communication Level 2 / Application of Number Level 2 / Information Technology Level 2
  • Employment Rights and Responsibilities

Additional Employer Requirements (optional – not mandatory components for framework completion):

  • Water Supply (Water Fittings) Regulations 1999 Certificate
  • Building Regulations Part P Certificate
  • CSCS Safety Card
  • Unit 50 (Advanced Mathematics & Science) City & Guilds Level III Certificate in Engineering

What support will I receive?

  1. LAC Mentor – The London Apprenticeship Company will appoint you a mentor who will be on hand to support you throughout your apprenticeship.
  2. Employer Supervisor – Your Employer Supervisor or Manager will address your needs at work and be responsible for making sure your employment is appropriate to your level of skill and training requirements.
  3. Trainer – Your trainer is responsible for making sure you are keeping up with your assignments, assessing you at work and ensuring the training they deliver meets all the industry requirements.

What happens after completion?

The three most likely progression routes will be:

  1. Continued employment – If you have done well in your job, your employer may offer you continued employment.
  2. Secure employment elsewhere – With your qualifications, experience and references in place, you will be in a great position to get a good job.
  3. Further training – Your apprenticeship can lead to further training such as an Advanced Apprenticeship or even university. (LAC will continue to support you if you choose to do an Advanced Apprenticeship.)